College of Charleston Professor Explores Supreme Court's Pace

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Political science professor Claire Wofford has published an article for The Conversation concerning the pace of an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

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U.S. Supreme Court justices normally take their time in issuing decisions. Douglas Rissing/iStock/Getty Images Plus

College of Charleston political science professor Claire Wofford has published an article for The Conversation concerning the pace of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on a landmark case.

Wofford argues that, although some people may be impatient with the Supreme Court’s pace in making decisions, it is important to remember that a rushed, careless decision will have harmful consequences for the country.

“Frustration is mounting as the country waits – and waits and waits – for the U.S. Supreme Court to issue its decision in Trump v. United States, the case that asks whether the former president is immune from criminal prosecution for what he did in the wake of the 2020 election,” says Wofford. “But this doesn’t mean the court should depart from its standard operating procedure. In fact, if you ask the justices to proceed at anything other than their normally plodding pace, you are asking them to be exactly what critics so decry – political.”

She writes that rapid decisions have come from the court, but they happen once in a blue moon and rarely stand up well to either legal analysis or history.

Read the complete article on The Conversation.

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